Tag Archives: Mexican cuisine

La Gringa Cooks, Chorizo, Chard and Potato Chowder

Just a couple of Baja beach dogs enjoying the sunset, Biscuit, my Lhasapoo and his best poodle friend Moxy Mayham.

I’m growing organic Swiss chard on my deck in pots. Chard is a fast growing nutritious green vegetable that loves the Baja climate. It grew from seed to harvest in 4 weeks.


I planted Thai basil, parsley, oregano, chives, arugula, mesclun, two types of mint, rosemary, lovage and lavender. The herbs are always fresh and I know that they are organic. This garden is a definite Baja success.

Here’s a simple chowder made with readily available Mexican chorizo (Italian sausage would be a close substitution), potatoes, Swiss chard or spinach, chicken stock and a touch of cream. It’s a spicy re-creation of Zuppa Tuscana Soup. You can substitute any legume for a vegetarian meal but you’ll need to add red pepper and paprika to mimic the chorizo flare.
I’m taking my soup to Fiesta Friday where you can find more delicious recipes.

Chorizo, Chard and Potato Chowder

Ingredients:
4 ounces chorizo
2 medium potatoes, any variety, diced
1/2 chopped onion
4 cups chicken stock, unsalted
3 cups chopped fresh Swiss chard
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
1/4 cup la crema, or half and half

Preparation:
Brown chorizo, drain off the majority of grease. Add onion and sauté until opaque. Add chicken stock and potatoes. Boil 15 minutes until potatoes are soft. Add chard and cilantro, return to a boil and reduce to a simmer for 5 minutes. Stir in cream and serve with fresh bread or tortillas.

 

Baja Stuffed Peppers

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What inspires your cooking?
Smells, colors, freshness, memories, blog posts, magazine photos?
I’m inspired by all of these things and my weekly menu is designed around the freshest ingredients that I can find. This is a weeks worth of produce which costs me between $8-12 US depending on how much fruit I buy. Fruit is relatively expensive here because most of it has to travel farther than local vegetables. Mexico does grow a large amount of citrus, melons and tropical fruits which are available year round but I often splurge on American apples and pears which are expensive by Mexican standards. Apples can cost $1.50 each. Gasp. A huge cabbage costs about $.50 in comparison.

I buy produce at our outdoor market every Sunday and meat in town from a local grocery store or from the butcher. I confess that buying the meats on display on tables at the open air market makes my “food safety” radar go on high alert. I do realize that our local restaurants buy meat there, I’ve seen my favorite chef actually choosing meats, but I haven’t been able to get past the flys and feral dogs hovering about. I’m failing at complete Mexican cooking immersion but I’m sure there will be a blog post on the day that I give in.

This stuffed pepper recipe was inspired by these beautiful striped bell peppers. I choose the vegetables, add my aromatics, pick a cuisine or a combination of cuisines, add a protein source and start to design the dish.

Baja Stuffed Peppers

Mix and Match Ingredients for 4 servings:

4 bell peppers, any color
1 pound ground beef, chicken, turkey or pork. Vegans substitute legumes, tofu, nuts.
1/2 cup cooked “grains” quinoa, rice, bulgar. I used quinoa
1/2 cup diced onion
2 gloves garlic minced
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cup chopped vegetables, I used carrots, tomatoes, and zucchini.
1/2 finely chopped chili pepper, serrano, poblano, jalepeno for heat
1/2 cup tomatoe sauce
1/2 cup chopped fresh herbs. I used flat leaf parsley, lovage and oregano. Cilantro or basil would be great too.
1 teaspoon salt, to taste
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Preparation:

Sauté onion and garlic in olive oil. Add lean protein and brown. Add remaining herbs, vegetables and seasonings. Simmer until vegetables are soft but still hold their shape.
Slice off the top of each pepper and remove seeds. Stuff peppers with meat mixture and replace the tops. I use any remaking meat mixture to pack around the peppers in a casserole dish to hold them upright.

Bake for 40 minutes at 375 degrees until peppers are soft.
Serve with salsa, sour cream, more veggies (sautéed beet greens) and fruit.

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