Faith Shaken

Friday Fictioneers
Photo credit @Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Faith Shaken

Kneeling in deference to the rituals of her youth, “Holy Mary Mother of God,” she prayed, stumbling over the words, searching for a faith that had long eluded her, “surely You, must understand?” The ceiling fan in the hospital chapel rattled in an off-balance cadence; tilting on its axis, much like the grieving mother. No whispered answers, no shroud of peace, no closer to understanding; she rose from the bench and returned to the ICU. Alone with her decision, she nodded yes, it was time to let go. The machinery stopped.

In the silence that followed, her child reached the light, a guiding Mother’s hand ensuring safe passage.

You can find more flash fiction here.
image

51 Comments Add yours

  1. ansumani says:

    Heart-wrenching story! Trust in a kinder immortal mother must have allowed the mortal mother to let go.

    Like

    1. I think that’s the point about any faith, we (at least I), never really get a direct answer. Nor do I expect one.

      Like

      1. ansumani says:

        No one gets a direct answers…It’s the answers we give to ourselves at the end that matter.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Victo Dolore says:

    Gave me chills. Good work!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Victo,
      I felt the pain of the mother and the physician. I’m sure you’ve had to facilitate these end of life decisions too. Such a privilege and a burden we share.
      Tracey

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Yolanda Renee says:

    Well written, heartfelt journey. Love the description ‘off-balance cadence; tilting on its axis, much like the grieving mother’.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Yolanda and thanks for stopping by.
      Tracey

      Like

  4. Vinay Leo R. says:

    That tugged at the heartstrings. I guess she knew it was time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for stopping by. Your heart isn’t safe around this blog. I write about human suffering a lot, but promise that the food posts will be heart healthy. 🙂
      Tracey

      Like

  5. I would guess a decision like that would be the hardest ever to take.. loosing a child.. so sad and so well written.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Bjorn,
      I watched my Mother make that decision with my oldest sister years ago. So painful for everyone involved. I don’t know where that strength comes from.
      Tracey

      Like

  6. Wow! Excellent! Filled with emotion and tension. The end was so sad, but you also made it beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Joy,
      Thank you. What a lovely compliment.
      Tracey

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It was a wonderful story!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. I can not imagine….but your story helps me to.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I can only imagine it myself and for that I am grateful.
      T

      Liked by 1 person

  8. plaridel says:

    somehow a mother must know it was time to let go.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dear Tracey,

    This one brought tears.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rochelle,
      The tears flowed for me as well. It’s been a rough week. I have always struggled with my own feelings about faith. I’m always out of step with my family’s deep faith.
      Thank you for the tears,
      Tracey

      Like

  10. Archon's Den says:

    Hard enough to lose a mother, but devastating to lose a child. Well told. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. I don’t know if I would have the strength to endure it.
      Tracey

      Like

  11. Danny James says:

    Been there. Done that. Still wondering if I did the right thing.

    DJ

    Liked by 1 person

    1. DJ,
      I hope that it’s some comfort to you to know that doctors don’t give you choices about end of life decisions unless there is no other choice to make. Meaning that the final outcome will be the same regardless of the decision that you make.
      Thank you for sharing that with me,
      Tracey

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Danny James says:

        Thanks! That’s a comfort. Father and Sister.

        DJ

        Liked by 1 person

  12. k rawson says:

    I could picture it so vividly. Losing a child is certainly one of the things that can shake one’s faith.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I agree. This piece started with a visual and wrote itself.
      Tracey

      Like

  13. Sandra says:

    Such a very sad story, such a difficult decision.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sandy,
      Sad but I wanted you to feel the mother’s peace in the end as well. Whether or not her decision was guided by a higher power, I’ll never know.
      Thank you for the French river stories.
      Tracey

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Oh my, I can hear the weighty groan of the unsteady fan and feel the heaviness of the grieving mother’s heart. Poetically written.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes! That was exactly what I was trying to express with the fan.
      Tracey

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Mission accomplished!

        Liked by 1 person

  15. rgayer55 says:

    I loved the line about the out-of-balance fan. A perfect fit for the emotions swirling during that situation. Faith is a difficult thing to wrap one’s mind around. Even us believers have doubts. However, hope is what delivers comfort and and your last line gave us that freedom to let go.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Russell,
      Your comment gave me pause to reflect so I re-read my other stories about human suffering. I do have a tendency to leave the reader with hope and I avoid writers who leave me feeling hopeless. “Hope is what delivers comfort.” I have faith in that.
      Thank you,
      Tracey

      Like

  16. Margaret says:

    So many wonderful touches to your story, Tracey. The imagery works so well to convey the mother’s state of mind. A really moving scene.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Amy Reese says:

    I can’t imagine having to make that difficult decision as a mother. What a heart-wrenching story. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. gahlearner says:

    Sometimes letting go is all that’s left to do for a loved one. Such a heartbreak of a story, and an imaginative take on the prompt. Great!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. Thank you for the praise.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Sad. Just how does one make decisions like that?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It helps if you have had these discussions before the end if life but you would never think to discuss it with a child of course. We never expect to bury our children.

      Like

  20. The last gift you can give is the hardest. Heart-wrenching, and you told it so well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I’ve been on both sides of these decisions. As family and physician. (Clearly not as the patient.)

      Like

  21. Jan Brown says:

    A realistic story, told with such compassion. Lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. draliman says:

    Very sad story, such a terrible and difficult decision to have to make.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. MythRider says:

    I like that you didn’t end your story in death, but in answered prayer.

    Like

    1. Perhaps we never know if or when our prayers are answered. I’m sure that in the moment this mother felt abandoned.
      Thank you for commenting.
      Tracey

      Like

      1. MythRider says:

        I don’t know. I’ve felt it when my prayers are answered. Maybe she did too.

        Like

  24. A sad, gentle story with a happy ending even though the mother hasn’t realized. It would be so heartbreaking to finally come to the acceptance you have to let go of a loved one. It would especially tear at the heart of a mother to let her child go. Lovely story, Tracey,and so well written. — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Suzzanne. I think all of us can relate to this mother’s grief.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s